Current research articles and news

  • In October 2020, a report came from the State of Global Air which showed that half a million babies died in 2019 as a result of air pollution. Read more here.

  • The BAMSE study, which is still ongoing, has shown that the growth of lung volume was worse in the children who lived in Stockholm in the 1990s during infancy in areas with dirty air, measured here as PM10. In the study, more than 4,000 children were followed. Read more here.

  • According to a new Swedish study, it has been proven that exposure to air pollutants during the fetal stage can be a risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Read more here.

  • In an epidemiological study conducted in the USA, a link between exposure to air pollutants (PM 2.5) during the first period in life and ASD has been identified. Read more here.

  • A meta-analysis based on ten European birth cohorts from the 1990s and 2000s suggests that air pollution increases the risk of respiratory infections, especially pneumonia, in children up to 2 years of age. Read more here.

  • Infants living in areas with high levels of air pollution are at greater risk of dying. Read more here.

  • There is an association between exposure to PM10 from traffic emissions during pregnancy and early childhood and reduced lung capacity in 8-year-olds. Read more here.

  • There is a strong suspicion that the mother’s exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy may increase the risk of premature birth and low birth weight, even at levels that are common in Swedish cities. Read more here and here.

  • Measles is a highly contagious viral disease that globally harvests many victims among young children. Read more here.


  • One effect of measles is the encephalitis SSPE, which can lead to impaired cognitive ability, behavioral changes and death. SSPE can lie dormant for 7 to 10 years before being reactivated. The risk increases in children younger than 5 years and in adults over 20 years. Read more here.